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For Many, Winter is Fall Season

The ankle joint is vulnerable to serious injury from hard falls on ice. Ice accelerates the fall and often causes more severe trauma because the foot can go in any direction after slipping.  Often, in cases of less severe fractures and sprains, it’s possible to walk and mistakenly believe the injury doesn’t require medical treatment.  

Never assume the ability to walk means your ankle isn’t broken or badly sprained. Putting weight on the injured joint can worsen the problem and lead to chronic instability, joint pain and arthritis later in life. 

Some people may fracture and sprain an ankle at the same time, and a bad sprain can mask the fracture. It’s best to have an injured ankle evaluated as soon as possible for proper diagnosis and treatmentIf you can’t see a foot and ankle surgeon or visit the emergency room right away, follow the RICE technique – Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation – until medical care is available. 

According to the ACFAS consumer Web site, FootHealthFacts.org, even though symptoms of ankle sprains and fractures are similar, fractures are associated with:  

Most ankle fractures and some sprains are treated by immobilizing the joint in a cast or splint to foster union and healing. However, surgery may be needed to repair fractures with significant mal-alignment to unite bone fragments and realign them properly.  

Newly designed surgical plates and screws allow repair of these injuries with less surgical trauma. With newer bone-fixation methods, there are smaller incisions to minimize tissue damage and bleeding and accelerate the healing process.  

If you fall on an icy spot and hurt your ankle, the best advice is to seek medical attention immediately. This aids in early diagnosis and proper treatment of the ankle injury and reduces the risk of further damage. 

For further information about ankle fractures and sprains or other foot and ankle problems, contact Dr. Eric J. Abrams to schedule an appointment at either the Eatontown or Toms River office.

Author
Dr. Eric J. Abrams Dr. Abrams is a Fellow of the American College of Foot & Ankle Surgeons and is board certified by the American Board of Foot & Ankle Surgery. He currently practices in Monmouth and Ocean counties in New Jersey. He is also a clinical instructor at Jersey Shore University Medical Center's Podiatric Surgical Residency in Neptune, New Jersey.

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